Galschiøt


Materials

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A picture is worth a 1.000 words

A picture is worth 1,000 words!


A picture is worth 1,000 words according to an old saying. In my opinion that goes for works of art too!


I am often contacted by organizations, journalists, debaters, enthusiasts, researchers, writers etc. from around the world who ask, if they can use pictures of my sculptures to illustrate their written words or as a symbol on a debate, they want to raise. Sometimes in countries where the word is not free and where works of art can instead be used as a symbol on something that is illegal to put into words.


And because pictures and works of art are worth a 1000 words, I hereby give my works of art free so that they can speak for themselves. All images of my artwork can thus be downloaded and used freely for all non-commercial purposes without copyright.


Jens Galschiøt (17.11.2020)

As part of the "A work of art says more than 1,000 words" campaign, we will therefore regularly focus on one of Jens Galschiot's most iconic works of art and share photos that can be freely used.


By clicking on the various works of art, you will find high-resolution images.

All pictures on this website, Jens Galschiot and Galleri Galschiot's other websites, social media etc. can hereby be freely downloaded and used for all non-commercial purposes without copyright.

Survival of the Fattest af Jens Galschiøt

Survival of the Fattest - 2002


Survival of the Fattest is a sculpture of a starved african man carrying a huge fat woman from the west, with a weight in her hand. The sculpture was made by Jens Galschiøt in 2002 as a symbol of the uneven distribution of the world's resources. The title is reminiscent of Charles Darwin's famous phrase 'Survival of the Fittest'.


The 3.5 metre high sculpture was created by Jens Galschiøt in collaboration with his colleague Lars Calmar. The sculpture epitomizes the imbalanced distribution of the world’s resources. We are living comfortably, oppressing the poor by means of a biased and unjust system of global trade. The richest countries enforce discriminatory trade policies and subsidies to keep the poorest countries out of competition.


The sculpture was unveiled  in December of 2002 in Copenhagen. Subsequently Danish NGOs used the sculpture in their campaign against the hegemony which is the global trade racket. 


Click here to see the HD pictures